Why Do Dogs Eat Poop
Why Do Dogs Eat Poop?

A Tasteful Discussion

Like any companion or roommate, dogs — for all their love and cuteness—have habits we just don’t understand. One question dog owners often ask their pets: “Why? Why would you eat poop?”

 

default album dogs eat poop graph
 

When we polled* dog owners recently, most thought it was because a dog is lacking nutrients (49%), they’re anxious (43%) or they just think it tastes good (40%).

Dogs are significantly more likely to eat the droppings of another species (e.g., horses, rabbits) than their own.
 

But Why? Whyyyyy?

We held our noses and got to the bottom of the issue with the help of some experts.
 

Do Dogs Eat Poop Because They Lack Nutrients?

While those in our poll thought this was the number-one reason for the behavior, it has actually never been proven. “It’s a myth dogs eat poop because they’re seeking nutrients they aren’t getting. There’s no evidence to back this,” says 

Opens a new windowDr. Jo Gale, BVetMed CertLAS MRCVS, Senior Manager, Global Science Advocacy at Waltham Petcare Science Institute.
 

 

eatpoop fr-1

 

Do Dogs Eat Poop Because They're Anxious?

According to 

Opens a new windowDr. Tammie King, Applied Behavior Technical Leader at Waltham Petcare Science Institute, “It can occur where there is lack of environmental enrichment. You see this often in dogs who are kenneled and have a lack of opportunity to exhibit normal canine behavior.” So if you need another excuse to get out and play with your pooch, this is a good one.
 

 

Do Dogs Eat Poop Because of the Taste?

Believe it or not, this is the main reason dogs eat poop. Dr. Jo Gale explains: “Dogs are scavengers by nature and use any opportunity to eat what they can, when they can. They consider it a ‘tasty snack.’” Dr. Tammie King adds that “[Dogs eating poop] is a learned behavior. They’ve done it, enjoyed it, and that behavior is repeated.”

We love our dogs so much that we’re willing to trust our best friends on this. Maybe we should come out with a line of doggie breath mints though. Hmm.

 

eatpoop fr-2
 

Is Eating Poop Harmful to Dogs?

“Ingesting feces from any animal increases potential for ingesting parasites and pathogens,” cautions Opens a new windowDr. James Serpell BSc, Phd Professor of Humane Ethics & Animal Welfare at University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. He went on to say, “[It’s] not something humans should ignore, but it's not worth getting too excited about it.”

All the experts we consulted said that if your dog occasionally eats poop, it’s nothing to be overly alarmed by. Just keep an eye on the frequency and their overall health. And as always, make sure they’re getting a nutritious diet and plenty of exercise and attention. If you have any concerns contact your vet.

Despite dogs liking the taste of poop, we’re going to stick with the healthy range of more traditional flavors offered in all IAMS dog foods.
 

*Surveyed U.S. dog owners, age 18+

Sample Size: n=201

Fielded May 8 to May 10, 2020

  • Nutritional Needs of Pregnant and Nursing Dogs
    Nutritional Needs of Pregnant and Nursing Dogs

    Nutritional Needs of Pregnant and Nursing Dogs

    Pregnancy and nursing are not only responsible for many changes in a dog's body, but for changes in her lifestyle as well. If your dog is pregnant or nursing, pay special attention to her changing nutritional needs as she carries, delivers and nurses her puppies.

     

    Before Pregnancy: Plan Ahead

    If you're planning to breed your female dog, it’s important to assess her body condition well in advance of breeding. Because of the physical demands of pregnancy and nursing, a dog with less-than-ideal health can experience problems:

    • An underweight dog often has difficulty consuming enough food to support both her own nutritional needs and those of her developing puppies.
    • Overweight dogs may experience abnormal or difficult labor because of large fetuses.

     

    Be sure to feed the proper amounts of a complete and balanced diet. This will support the mother's healthy weight and body condition before breeding and help maintain her health and that of her babies throughout pregnancy and lactation.

     

     

    Pregnancy: Monitor Your Dog’s Weight Gain

    The gestation period for dogs is nine weeks. Pregnant dogs gain weight only slightly until about the sixth week, and then gain weight rapidly.
     

    The energy requirements of pregnant dogs are reflected in the pattern of weight gain. Pregnant dogs will need to consume 25% to 50% more than their normal food intake by the end of pregnancy, but energy requirements do not increase until about the sixth week.
     

    The best diet for pregnant and nursing dogs is a high-quality, nutrient-dense pet food formulated for all life stages or for growth. Although puppy diets are generally recommended for pregnant or nursing dogs, large-breed puppy formulas may not be appropriate for this use due to their adjusted energy and mineral content.

     

     

    Nursing: Make Sure Your Dog Gets Sufficient Nutrition

    Pregnant dogs lose weight after giving birth, but their nutritional needs increase dramatically. Depending on litter size, nursing dogs might need two to three times their normal food requirement to nourish their pups. Be sure your nursing mom has plenty of water so she can generate the milk volume she needs to feed the litter.
     

    To help your nursing dog get enough nutrition, you can try several tactics:

    • Feed a nutrient-dense diet such as puppy food.
    • Without increasing the amount of food offered at a meal, increase the number of meals throughout the day.
    • Free-choice feed her, offering unlimited access to dry food throughout the day.

     

    article nutritional needs of pregnant and nursing dogs inset

     

    Weaning: Return to a Pre-pregnancy Diet

    By four to five weeks after birth, most puppies are showing an interest in their mother’s food. Gradually, the puppies will begin eating more solid food and nursing less. At the same time, the nursing mother will usually begin eating less. Most puppies are completely weaned around age 7 to 8 weeks. By this time, the mother's energy requirement is back to normal, and she should be eating her normal pre-pregnancy diet.

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