How to Handle Your Adult Dog’s Shedding
How to Handle Your Adult Dog’s Shedding

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How to Handle Your Adult Dog’s Shedding

If you own a dog, chances are, you deal with the nuisance of shedding fur. Fortunately, there are some easy ways to help keep your dog's shedding to a manageable level.

If you own a dog, chances are, you deal with the nuisance of shedding fur. Fortunately, there are some easy ways to help keep your dog's shedding to a manageable level.

 

 

Bred to Shed

The main factor related to how much your dog sheds is which breed you own. Certain breeds, such as Yorkshire Terriers and Poodles, hardly shed at all, and are especially well suited for people who suffer from dander-related allergies. But if one of these hypoallergenic breeds is not your dog of choice, then chances are you deal with some amount of shedding. Here are some practical tips to deal with all of that hair.

 

 

Bad Hair Days

Many dogs are seasonal shedders. As the temperatures begin to drop, so does the fur. Dogs shed their summer coats in the fall as their winter coats come in. The best way to deal with this is to be prepared. Brush your dog more often and vacuum more frequently. This will keep that extra hair from becoming too unmanageable.

 

Dogs also will go through their own version of spring cleaning. When the temperatures begin to rise in the spring, dogs will begin shedding that extra winter hair. Again, preparation is the key. Regular brushing and vacuuming will help you get through these “hairy” times.

 

 

Less Shedding Through Nutrition?

Between the millions of strands of hair constantly growing, some breeds of dogs grow up to a total of 100 feet of fur per day! But, while your dog might not boast those kinds of hair-growth numbers, constantly replacing fur still places a demand on a dog’s system. Thirty percent of a dog's protein needs go toward hair growth. If a dog is not receiving proper nutrition, the dog's body will put the protein he's receiving toward maintaining muscle mass, leaving the coat to suffer.

 

A healthy, shiny coat is not only a sign of proper nutrition, but it also sheds less than an unhealthy coat. Premium dog food like IAMS™ ProActive Health™ provides dogs with the nutrients they need to keep their coat healthy, which means less shedding.

 

 

High Time for Hygiene

Brushing doesn't have to be a necessary evil. Train your dog to enjoy brushing, offering frequent praise during the process, and maybe even a treat at the end. This is easiest done from the time your dog is a puppy, but older dogs can be taught to enjoy brushing as well. The importance of brushing cannot be overemphasized. Just look at all the hair that ends up in the brush, and realize if it weren’t in the brush, it would be on your couch, floor, and perhaps, bed.

 

Be sure you're using the right kind of brush for your dog's coat. Breeds with thick undercoats need a specific type of brush, while longhaired breeds need a comb.

 

Last but not least, make sure to give your dog an occasional bath. Aside from the obvious benefit of having a clean, good-smelling pooch, your dog's coat will also benefit. Be warned though: Bathing your dog too frequently washes away the natural oil on his skin and coat, resulting in dry skin and, you guessed it, more shedding.

 

 

A Little Extra Time Goes a Long Way

Committing the time to maintaining your dog's coat will help keep his shedding under control. Frequent brushing and vacuuming, and feeding your dog a balanced diet such as IAMS ProActive Health Adult MiniChunks will have you worrying less about an overabundance of hair and more time enjoying your furry friend.

  • Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On
    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

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    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

    Keeping Your Senior Dog Healthy and Active

    It depends on the breed of dog, but your pet's senior years generally begin at age 7. Louise Murray, DVM, director of the ASPCA's Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York City and author of Vet Confidential (Ballantine, 2008), tells you what you need to know to keep your older dog spry and happy.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Preventive Health

    At this stage, Murray recommends taking your dog to the vet twice a year. "So much can happen to an elderly dog," she says. Your veterinarian can take blood annually to test liver and kidney functions. "Discovering problems early is extremely important," she says. Your vet can be on the lookout for conditions that often affect older dogs, such as anemia and arthritis.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Urination, Bowel Movements, and Appetite

    Pay attention to what might be subtle changes in your dog's habits: Is she drinking more water or urinating larger amounts? These behaviors might indicate a liver or kidney problem. Have your dog's bowel movements shifted? This could indicate a digestive issue. Diabetes or digestive problems might cause your dog to eat more but still lose weight. Knowing the dog's patterns can help the veterinarian determine a course of treatment.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Medicines

    Continue to use preventive medicines.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Dental Health

    Clean your dog's teeth daily. If she has tartar buildup, you might need to have her teeth professionally cleaned at your vet's office, which requires sedating your pet.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Exercise

    Your dog is probably less active, so steady, moderate exercise is best for her now. Don't turn her into a "weekend warrior" who, after lying around on weekdays, accompanies you on a 10-mile hike on Saturdays. This is especially hard on an older dog's joints.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Diet

    Your veterinarian might wish to put your dog on a senior diet, such as IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Senior Plus. These formulations contain nutrients specifically geared toward older-dog health.

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