How to house train a puppy
How to house train a puppy

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How to house train a puppy

A new puppy is wonderful in pretty much every way, at least until they start having accidents around your apartment or house. But do not fear, Expert Pet Trainer Kathy Santo has all the answers. Watch as she takes you through the basics on everything from establishing a routine to rewarding your puppy when they eliminate outdoors.

 

House training your puppy requires more than a stack of old newspapers. It calls for patience, commitment, and above all, consistency. Hi, I'm Kathy Santo with IAMS, and today we're going to talk about how to house train your puppy. A trusting and consistent relationship is fundamental to successful house trading. The more consistent you are, the faster your puppy will learn. House training a puppy can take several weeks, and sometimes longer with smaller breeds. The first step to house training your puppy is to establish a routine. Puppies do best on a regular schedule, because it teaches them that there are times to eat, times to play, and times to potty. As a general rule, a puppy can control his bladder about an hour for every month of age.

How to house train a puppy play button

So if your puppy is only three months old, he can probably only hold it for about three hours, if not less.Make sure to take him right out after he wakes up, during and after play time, and after eating or drinking, because these are times he'd most likely to have to go. If you work, and are unable to take your puppy outside as often as needed, you could hire a dog walker to give your puppy his necessary breaks. I recommend picking a specific bathroom spot outside, and always taking him there first when he's on a leash. While your puppy is going, say something like, "go potty," so that you can eventually use that phrase to remind him what to do. You should take him out for a walk or play time after he's gone potty, or he might just learn to hold it to keep you outside. Reward your puppy every time he goes potty outdoors with praise or a treat, but make sure to do so immediately, before he goes back into the house. Rewarding correct behavior is the best way to teach your puppy. Be careful not to reward your puppy until he's completely finished, or he may forget to finish up outside, and then have an accident inside. And remember, what goes into a puppy on a schedule comes out of a puppy on a schedule. So always take your puppy out after feeding. Try picking up your puppy's water dish about two and a half hours before bedtime, so he won't have as much water to try and hold overnight. If you keep a consistent schedule, your puppy could be house trained by the time he's five to six months old. But don't be discouraged if it takes your puppy longer, or has an occasional accident. Many factors, including breed of dog, consistency, and temperament can contribute to a longer training period. If you feel that there's little to no progress, consult with your veterinarian to be sure that a medical issue, such as a bladder infection, isn't the culprit. Supervision in the beginning is critical. Exercise pens are extremely helpful while house training. Keeping your puppy in a small space within eyesight will allow you to notice and react when they start showing the signs of needing to eliminate. Those signs can be barking, scratching at the door, squatting, sniffing, or circling. If you're unable to monitor your puppy, you can confine him to an area small enough so that he won't want to eliminate there. A space just large enough for him to lay down with a couple extra inches is just fine. Many people choose to combine with a crate, which can be very helpful for house training your young dog. For more information on crate training, watch "How To Crate Train Your Puppy." I'm Kathy Santo with IAMS, and I hope that you found this helpful as you welcome your new addition to your family.

  • Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On
    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

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    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

    Keeping Your Senior Dog Healthy and Active

    It depends on the breed of dog, but your pet's senior years generally begin at age 7. Louise Murray, DVM, director of the ASPCA's Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York City and author of Vet Confidential (Ballantine, 2008), tells you what you need to know to keep your older dog spry and happy.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Preventive Health

    At this stage, Murray recommends taking your dog to the vet twice a year. "So much can happen to an elderly dog," she says. Your veterinarian can take blood annually to test liver and kidney functions. "Discovering problems early is extremely important," she says. Your vet can be on the lookout for conditions that often affect older dogs, such as anemia and arthritis.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Urination, Bowel Movements, and Appetite

    Pay attention to what might be subtle changes in your dog's habits: Is she drinking more water or urinating larger amounts? These behaviors might indicate a liver or kidney problem. Have your dog's bowel movements shifted? This could indicate a digestive issue. Diabetes or digestive problems might cause your dog to eat more but still lose weight. Knowing the dog's patterns can help the veterinarian determine a course of treatment.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Medicines

    Continue to use preventive medicines.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Dental Health

    Clean your dog's teeth daily. If she has tartar buildup, you might need to have her teeth professionally cleaned at your vet's office, which requires sedating your pet.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Exercise

    Your dog is probably less active, so steady, moderate exercise is best for her now. Don't turn her into a "weekend warrior" who, after lying around on weekdays, accompanies you on a 10-mile hike on Saturdays. This is especially hard on an older dog's joints.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Diet

    Your veterinarian might wish to put your dog on a senior diet, such as IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Senior Plus. These formulations contain nutrients specifically geared toward older-dog health.

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