Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

adp_description_block455
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

Big dogs equal big love

Whether your dog is a big sweetie, a big weirdo or a big athlete, here’s what you need to know about taking care of your big dog.
 

First, all big dogs start out as little dogs. But pretty soon they grow up — and so does their appetite, their toys, their dog bowls, the vet bill and their need for speed.
 

He started to grow.
And pretty soon
he was bigger than
the recliner.

 

 

Large dogs grow more slowly than smaller ones

Sometimes it can take more than two years for them to reach their full size.
 

And you won’t like to think about it too much, but their life spans are shorter, too: about 10 to 12 years.
 

No wonder
you'll let him push
you off the bed
at night.

 

 

So remember: Everything in moderation.

If a large dog gets too much food as a pup, they’re at a higher risk of growing too quickly, which can cause joint trouble.
 

For large breeds, being overweight is especially problematic. All that extra weight can be a lot for the joints to carry around.
 

Keep your good old dog healthy by practicing portion control and feeding nutritious food like IAMS™ Mature Adult Large Breed.
 

How will she catch
a screaming
15-mile-an-hour
Frisbee in midair
if she has knee trouble.

 

 

A word about exercising with a large dog.

Back in the day, large-breed dogs were especially energetic. They were working dogs, herders, hunters, cart pullers and people protectors.

 

Who are we to deny their evolution?

Make sure your dog gets exercise every day.
 

How do you accomplish this? Walk, walk and more walk. And add in some running, jumping, chasing, hiking, fetching, dog-park visiting, swimming and even agility courses.
 

Repeat this mantra:
"I am the alpha."

 

When it comes to training, think of it this way: The bigger the dog, the harder it is to hide behavior problems. And if you can’t control your super-sized soulmate, they could inadvertently cause damage or hurt someone.

  • Make time for training from day one.
  • Teach easy commands early.
  • Use a firm and confident voice.
  • Keep your dog exercised to fend off boredom-induced behaviors.
  • Reward good behaviors.

 

Living large is all
about biting the
wind and living
that sweet,
sweet life.

Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs
Tips for Caring for Large Dogs

adp_related_article_block324 90 YOUR --spice-- MAY ALSO LIKE …

  • Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On
    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

    adp_description_block379
    Your Senior Dog’s Health from 7 Years On

    Keeping Your Senior Dog Healthy and Active

    It depends on the breed of dog, but your pet's senior years generally begin at age 7. Louise Murray, DVM, director of the ASPCA's Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in New York City and author of Vet Confidential (Ballantine, 2008), tells you what you need to know to keep your older dog spry and happy.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Preventive Health

    At this stage, Murray recommends taking your dog to the vet twice a year. "So much can happen to an elderly dog," she says. Your veterinarian can take blood annually to test liver and kidney functions. "Discovering problems early is extremely important," she says. Your vet can be on the lookout for conditions that often affect older dogs, such as anemia and arthritis.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Urination, Bowel Movements, and Appetite

    Pay attention to what might be subtle changes in your dog's habits: Is she drinking more water or urinating larger amounts? These behaviors might indicate a liver or kidney problem. Have your dog's bowel movements shifted? This could indicate a digestive issue. Diabetes or digestive problems might cause your dog to eat more but still lose weight. Knowing the dog's patterns can help the veterinarian determine a course of treatment.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Medicines

    Continue to use preventive medicines.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Dental Health

    Clean your dog's teeth daily. If she has tartar buildup, you might need to have her teeth professionally cleaned at your vet's office, which requires sedating your pet.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Exercise

    Your dog is probably less active, so steady, moderate exercise is best for her now. Don't turn her into a "weekend warrior" who, after lying around on weekdays, accompanies you on a 10-mile hike on Saturdays. This is especially hard on an older dog's joints.

     

     

    Senior Dog Health: Diet

    Your veterinarian might wish to put your dog on a senior diet, such as IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Senior Plus. These formulations contain nutrients specifically geared toward older-dog health.

both email signup

STAY INFORMED

Enter your email for customized pet advice, product updates, brand news and more!

SIGN UP FOR OUR E-NEWSLETTER

Shop Dogs

Shop Cats

Why IAMS™

© 2021 Mars or Affiliates. US Patents Pending. Other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
chat icon

CHAT WITH AN EXPERT