Why Beet Pulp is Good for Dogs
Why Beet Pulp is Good for Dogs

Beet pulp is an important source of fiber that is good for helping your dog maintain intestinal health and can enhance his ability to absorb ingredients. Beet pulp is the material that remains after sugar is extracted from sugar beets.

 

 

How Fiber and Beet Pulp Affect Your Dog’s Digestion

There are two types of fiber: Nonfermentable and fermentable. Nonfermentable fiber remains undigested as it passes through a dog's intestines, providing bulk to move wastes out. Cellulose is an example of a nonfermentable fiber.
 

In contrast, fermentable fiber is broken down in the intestines into short-chain fatty acids that provide energy for cells that line the intestine.
 

Moderately fermentable fiber does both: It provides bulk to move waste and supplies energy to cells lining the intestine. Beet pulp is a moderately fermentable fiber. IAMS™ products contain a patented, moderately fermentable fiber, beet pulp, to keep your dog's digestive system healthy.

 

 

The Truth About Beet Pulp in Dog Food

Beet pulp contains no toxins and is not harmful. It is a very safe fiber source. Beet pulp does not affect coat color. There is nothing in beet pulp that can affect coat pigment—the inside is light in color, and the dark outside peel is not used in our foods.
 

By definition, beet pulp is the material left over after the sugar is removed from sugar beets. Therefore, beet pulp contains no sugar.
 

There is no evidence that beet pulp causes bloat. Bloat (gastric dilatation-volvulus or GDV) is related to a stomach defect that delays the stomach’s emptying. It is believed that bloat is not related to diet or ingredients, such as beet pulp. However, the cause of bloat remains unknown.

 

 

Beet Pulp and Dog Health Research

IAMS has conducted extensive research on many types of fiber. The results of this research point to the fact that beet pulp maintains intestinal health and works with other nutrients to provide optimal nutrition in all of our products, including IAMS™ ProActive Health™ Adult MiniChunks. No other food manufacturer can match our formulas. Only IAMS holds a patent for moderately fermentable beet pulp.

  • Is Your Mature Dog Eating Less?
    Is Your Mature Dog Eating Less?

    Does your mature dog sniff at his bowl and walk away instead of digging in? You may think he’s just being picky, but it’s important to keep an eye on how much he’s eating — especially if he’s a senior. While age-related diminishment of the senses of smell and taste may account for some of his disinterest in food, appetite loss can also indicate a serious medical problem.

    “It’s important to give your dog enough calories because weight loss can be debilitating to senior pets,” says Wendy Brooks, D.V.M., who warns that a loss in appetite should be mentioned to your vet. A good rule of thumb: If your pet hasn’t eaten in a day, make a visit to the vet. Here are six ways to entice your canine friend with a nourishing meal.

     

    article is your mature dog eating less header

     

    6 Ways to Encourage Your Senior Dog to Eat More

     

     

    1. Mix Dry Food with Moist Food

    Many animals find canned food more palatable because they like the taste and texture, Brooks says. You can top their favorite dry food with room-temperature wet food.

     

    2. Warm It Up

    Dogs like a warm or room-temperature (not hot or cold) meal. Avoid serving him day-old wet food from the refrigerator, and keep his food away from heat. Another reason he might not be eating: It's too hot outside.

     

    3. Try a Change

    Dogs prefer consistency when it comes to their food. Don't change every day, but try a new flavor, such as lamb or chicken, and see if he responds (it may trigger his sense of smell). To avoid an upset stomach, introduce a new food by mixing it with his old food in equal increments each day.

     

    4. Stay Close

    Common mature-dog health issues, such as arthritis or joint pain, can make it difficult for him to access his bowls. Keep food and water where he spends most of his time. Put a water bowl on all floors of the house, too.

     

    5. Keep the Fresh Water Flowing

    Older pets are at a higher risk of dehydration. Provide a clean bowl with fresh water at all times. It will help prevent disease, such as a kidney condition, and aid in digestion.

     

    6. Offer Praise

    Dogs are people pleasers. If you see him eating, give him a little verbal reward. He'll know it makes you happy and will repeat the behavior.

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