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Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten

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Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten

Your kitten is one of a kind, not to mention adorable. But training your li’l baby comes with some basic guidelines. Scroll on for a handful of our favorite kitten training tips.

 

 

Set up your kitten for litter box training success.

Introduce your new kitten to their litter box as soon as they get home. Then always set your cat in their box right after meals and as soon as they wake up from naps.
 

And don’t forget to reward your kitten with a treat, toy or some extra love after they use it.

 

Kitty, meet litter.

Litter, meet kitty.

 

 

Nip kitten biting in the bud.

When Kitty forgets their manners and bites you or shows their aggressive side, say “ow” or “no” clearly and sternly.
 

Then slowly remove your hand — or other body part — from their razor-sharp clutches. Pick up your kitten, place them away from you, walk away and ignore them.
 

You can also redirect them to a feather wand or another toy or activity if you want. But that’s your call.

 

Ouch!

That’s my hand,

not a treat, tiny cat.

 

 

Squash kitten scratching (and save your furniture).

By giving your little feline lots of sturdy scratching posts throughout your house, especially where they like to hang out, you can save your favorite furniture from unwanted claw marks and damage.
 

Oh, and be sure to trim your kitten’s nails regularly.

 

Say it with me:

Sofas are NOT

scratching posts.

 

 

Cue the cat carrier training.

Teach your kitten that their cat carrier is a safe, comfortable place to chillax and feel protected.
 

Trust us, by making a carrier part of your fuzzball’s daily life, road trips and vet visits will be easier and safer for years to come.

 

Cozy up,

Buttercup.

 

 

It's midnight. Bring on the zoomies, furry one.
(Actually, please don’t.)

 

 

Curb the crazies when you’re asleep.

Want to stop your kitten from bouncing off the walls while you’re supposed to be deep in slumber land? Try these tips.

 

 

Did you know there are five distinct cat personalities?

Yep, it’s true! One of our favorite Opens a new windowstudies from the University of South Australia proved it.

 


To help train your kitten, pick the word that best describes them:

 

 

 

 

Skittish

These anxious felines tend to run away when the doorbell rings and are fearful of new situations.


The key to training a skittish kitty? Practice lots of patience and never force them to face their fears, like meeting your house guests after they’ve already runaway and hidden.
 

 

Outgoing

Some call them nosy, but we call them fearless. Outgoing kitties are curious and adventurous. They love to explore and get into everything — and they sometimes act naughty because they’re bored.


One of the tricks to training an outgoing kitten is to give them lots of toys and actively play with them. It stimulates their mind and helps burn off energy.
 

 

Dominant

“Bossy” best describes these kitties. They bully other cats (and even other pets) and hog things like food bowls, toys and litter boxes.


If your kitten fits this category, be consistently firm and make sure you play with them regularly so they have less energy to be aggressive.


You might also want to make sure your little CEO (Cat Executive Officer) has their own food bowl, water bowl and litter box.
 

 

Spontaneous

Two words describe these felines: impulsive and erratic. Their behavior and moods are unpredictable, even if they’ve encountered the same situation before.


When training, never raise your voice — it’ll just ramp up your kitty’s nerves and make them more erratic.


Also, be sure to stick to a consistent daily schedule for feeding and playtime so your little fuzzball knows what to expect and doesn’t get stressed out.
 

 

Friendly

This personality is every cat lover’s dream.


These sweeties can usually be found curling up against your shins, meowing loudly and purring away.


The key to training these kittens is to never yell and to socialize them early and often. That way, they’ll continue to be everyone’s best friend for life.

 

You had me at
meow, li’l feline.

Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
  • gray and white kitten licking lips ready to eat healthy cat food containing taurine
    gray and white kitten licking lips ready to eat healthy cat food containing taurine

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    The Importance of Taurine in Kitten and Cat Food

    Taurine is an important component found in all IAMS™ kitten and cat foods. This important amino acid is essential for cats of all ages, and critical for healthy development, normal heart muscle function, vision and reproduction. It even aids in digestion!

     

    Unlike other amino acids, taurine is found as a free amino acid in body tissues, such as the heart and eyes, and is not incorporated into proteins.

     

    Most mammals manufacture taurine from other amino acids, but cats and kittens need more than their bodies can produce and rely on their food to make up the difference. Pet food’s animal-based protein ingredients are natural taurine sources, and the amino acid can also be added to pet food recipes on its own.

     

    Why Does IAMS™ Add Taurine to Kitten and Cat Food? 

    All IAMS™ kitten and cat foods are formulated with high-quality animal-based proteins that are naturally rich in taurine as their primary ingredient. So why supplement these foods with additional taurine? Two reasons: natural variability and the production process.

     

    IAMS™ Dry Cat Food: The Natural Variability 

    IAMS™ dry cat and kitten foods include taurine to supplement each food’s primary source of the amino acid — an animal-based protein like chicken, egg, lamb or fish. These natural sources naturally vary in their nutrient content, so adding supplemental taurine helps ensure your cat or kitten is getting enough in their diet every day.

     

    IAMS™ Wet Cat Food: The Production Process 

    For wet food, the canning process itself may affect the complex taurine balance of the food. That means IAMS™ wet cat foods must contain more taurine, as much as twice the taurine found in dry food, to ensure cats are getting enough.

     

    black kitten and white kitten laying on each other under a blanket, relaxed and full on healthy cat food containing taurine

     

    Symptoms of Taurine Deficiency in Cats and Kittens

    Cats and kittens need their taurine! Kittens need taurine for healthy growth and development, and adult cats that don’t get enough taurine can develop serious health conditions. Low levels of taurine put your pet at risk for preventable health conditions that can become serious over time.

     

    Impaired Vision and Blindness 

    Taurine is essential to the proper development and ongoing health of feline eyes, particularly the retinas. Without enough taurine, retinal cells can’t function properly and may die, which can cause impaired vision and even blindness (a process called feline central retinal degeneration).

     

    Heart Disease 

    Taurine plays a key role in supporting cardiovascular health, too. A lack of taurine weakens the heart muscle, which, in turn, can lead to heart failure. This condition is known as dilated cardiomyopathy and can be fatal.

     

    Decreased Reproductive Performance and Growth 

    Optimal reproductive health and growth also rely on taurine to complete a number of important health processes. Maintaining adequate levels during pregnancy, nursing and early growth helps ensure proper structural development for kittens and wellness for the mother.

     

     

    Feeding your pet well is an important part of taking care of them. Learning the importance of ingredients like taurine is one way you can ensure you’re giving them exactly what their body needs. By giving your kitten a healthy start and understanding  their nutritional needs, you’re giving them the best shot at a long, healthy and happy future. Your cat would thank you if they could!

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