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Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten

Your kitten is one of a kind, not to mention adorable. But training your li’l baby comes with some basic guidelines. Scroll on for a handful of our favorite kitten training tips.

 

 

Set up your kitten for litter box training success.

Introduce your new kitten to their litter box as soon as they get home. Then always set your cat in their box right after meals and as soon as they wake up from naps.
 

And don’t forget to reward your kitten with a treat, toy or some extra love after they use it.

 

Kitty, meet litter.

Litter, meet kitty.

 

 

Nip kitten biting in the bud.

When Kitty forgets their manners and bites you or shows their aggressive side, say “ow” or “no” clearly and sternly.
 

Then slowly remove your hand — or other body part — from their razor-sharp clutches. Pick up your kitten, place them away from you, walk away and ignore them.
 

You can also redirect them to a feather wand or another toy or activity if you want. But that’s your call.

 

Ouch!

That’s my hand,

not a treat, tiny cat.

 

 

Squash kitten scratching (and save your furniture).

By giving your little feline lots of sturdy scratching posts throughout your house, especially where they like to hang out, you can save your favorite furniture from unwanted claw marks and damage.
 

Oh, and be sure to trim your kitten’s nails regularly.

 

Say it with me:

Sofas are NOT

scratching posts.

 

 

Cue the cat carrier training.

Teach your kitten that their cat carrier is a safe, comfortable place to chillax and feel protected.
 

Trust us, by making a carrier part of your fuzzball’s daily life, road trips and vet visits will be easier and safer for years to come.

 

Cozy up,

Buttercup.

 

 

It's midnight. Bring on the zoomies, furry one.
(Actually, please don’t.)

 

 

Curb the crazies when you’re asleep.

Want to stop your kitten from bouncing off the walls while you’re supposed to be deep in slumber land? Try these tips.

 

 

Did you know there are five distinct cat personalities?

Yep, it’s true! One of our favorite Opens a new windowstudies from the University of South Australia proved it.

 


To help train your kitten, pick the word that best describes them:

 

 

 

 

Skittish

These anxious felines tend to run away when the doorbell rings and are fearful of new situations.


The key to training a skittish kitty? Practice lots of patience and never force them to face their fears, like meeting your house guests after they’ve already runaway and hidden.
 

 

Outgoing

Some call them nosy, but we call them fearless. Outgoing kitties are curious and adventurous. They love to explore and get into everything — and they sometimes act naughty because they’re bored.


One of the tricks to training an outgoing kitten is to give them lots of toys and actively play with them. It stimulates their mind and helps burn off energy.
 

 

Dominant

“Bossy” best describes these kitties. They bully other cats (and even other pets) and hog things like food bowls, toys and litter boxes.


If your kitten fits this category, be consistently firm and make sure you play with them regularly so they have less energy to be aggressive.


You might also want to make sure your little CEO (Cat Executive Officer) has their own food bowl, water bowl and litter box.
 

 

Spontaneous

Two words describe these felines: impulsive and erratic. Their behavior and moods are unpredictable, even if they’ve encountered the same situation before.


When training, never raise your voice — it’ll just ramp up your kitty’s nerves and make them more erratic.


Also, be sure to stick to a consistent daily schedule for feeding and playtime so your little fuzzball knows what to expect and doesn’t get stressed out.
 

 

Friendly

This personality is every cat lover’s dream.


These sweeties can usually be found curling up against your shins, meowing loudly and purring away.


The key to training these kittens is to never yell and to socialize them early and often. That way, they’ll continue to be everyone’s best friend for life.

 

You had me at
meow, li’l feline.

Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
Our Favorite Tips to Train a Kitten
  • cat-artcat article detail bannericle-detail-banner
    Understanding Kitten Food Nutrition Labels

    Understanding Kitten Food Nutrition Labels

    Confused by the ingredient list on your kitten’s food? You’re not alone. Marketing pet foods that have “human-grade ingredients” is becoming commonplace. While appealing to many pet owners, it is important to be aware that the term “human grade” has no legal definition and is used primarily for marketing purposes.
     

    Foods, typically meats, are labeled either as “edible” or “inedible, not for human consumption.” Once a food leaves the human food chain, even if it is of outstanding quality, it has to be labeled “inedible, not for human consumption.” Therefore, meats used in pet food must be labeled as “inedible,” regardless of the source or quality of the meat. The only way to make a pet food with ingredients deemed “edible” is to never let the meat leave the human food chain and actually manufacture the pet food in a human food facility and transport it using human food trucks. Therefore, advertising a product as containing “human-grade ingredients” is untrue if it is not manufactured in a human food facility. However, just because a pet food isn’t marketed as being “human grade” does not mean that the ingredients are poor quality.

     

     

    Here are some tips to help understand ingredient labels:

    • The ingredient list is not the only method you should use to select a pet food, because it doesn’t provide pet owners with enough information about the quality of the ingredients or the nutritional adequacy of the overall diet.
    • Instead of concentrating on ingredients, pet owners and veterinarians should look at the AAFCO nutritional adequacy statement and the quality control protocols of the manufacturer. For more information, see the World Small Animal Veterinary Association’s brochure “Selecting the Best Food for your Pet,” available at  Opens a new window www.wsava.org/nutrition-toolkit.
    • The ingredient list may be arranged to make foods as appealing as possible to consumers by the order of the ingredients (e.g., having lamb first on the ingredient list) or inclusion of seemingly desirable ingredients in the diet, but often in such small amounts that they have little or no nutritional benefits (e.g., artichokes and raspberries listed after the vitamin and mineral supplements).
    • Having more ingredients does not make a diet more nutritious.

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